Tiffen 87 IR Filter

Testing the Tiffen #87

Recently I picked up a NIB Tiffen #87 Infrared filter to see if I would enjoy working more with the shorter IR wavelengths (to produce a truer Black and White image) or if I wanted to stay with the 720 and under filters to achieve some color from visible light.
I have always preferred viewing B&W photos and movies to color and when I hold an image in my mind it is almost always in B&W.Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, monochrome, monochrome photography, Pentax K-01, Tiffen #87 Filter, Mono Lake CA, Owns Valley CA, Lee Vining CA
The 87 comes in around 795 or just at the baseline of the IR spectrum. Not quite as black as the 093 (830) or 87c (850) but still dark to the human eye.Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, monochrome, monochrome photography, Pentax K-01, Tiffen #87 Filter, Mono Lake CA, Owns Valley CA, Lee Vining CA
I do like the contrasty effect the monochrome images have over the false color, though it is difficult to achieve focus.
Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, monochrome, monochrome photography, Pentax K-01, Tiffen #87 Filter, Mono Lake CA, Owns Valley CA, Lee Vining CA
The majority of my favorite lenses are still manual focus, so I will just have to practice more.
If you can find this filter it is made of glass with a metal ring and well constructed, plus it comes in at about 1/2 the price of other name brands.
I find the images comparable to the Lee 87 film filters for those who already have a holder system.
Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, monochrome, monochrome photography, Pentax K-01, Lee #87 Filter, Mono Lake CA, Owns Valley CA, Lee Vining CA
I did notice under the right light and white balance there were a few shots that did have a hint of blue sky after an attempt at color swapping.

 

2 thoughts on “Tiffen 87 IR Filter

  1. My understanding is that the Tiffen 87 IR filter was designed for actual IR film. I’ve just purchased one of these Bad Boys in a 77mm thread size and plan to use it with my RB 67 and a Canon EOS 1n film camera(s). Searching for information or reviews on this particular filter are pretty darn scarce.

    What i’m searching for is a “filter factor” or what ISO did you finally set at?
    Using Rollei 400 Infrared with a R72 IR filter I’ve found I can set the ISO at 12 (better at 6 ) and get really nice results.

    I have a converted to IR only Canon 20D love the thing except for one thing it’s too fast as 90 % of my images are made hand held.

    Exceptionally nice images would this be “Mono Lake” I hope I spelt that correctly.
    Most people wouldn’t understand B&W Infrared but these images make you stop and look nice work.

    Thanks for sharing

    • Thanks Robert and yes that is Mono Lake.
      I’m using the 87 for digital and it is becoming my favorite IR, a little bit of color if wanted and much warmer monochrome effect than the 800 and higher filters.
      From what I remember from the film days the filter is actually around 50% transmission at 780nm and about a filter factor of 3.
      The Mono Lake shots were done at ISO 400 and 1/125. I don’t have a record of the f-stop as I’m still using film era prime lenses but probably in the sweet spot area of 8.

      I’m a handheld addict and thus the change over to full spectrum digital so I can obtain these higher shutters and lower ISO’s.
      With macro and strobe I have been able to drop to 200 ISO and about 2 shutter stops lower than focal length.
      Are you planning on tripod? Seeming to recall ASA 800 for some reason because of the higher nm transmission than with the R72.
      Also, I do notice this filter will definitely show any lens hotspot weakness, especially with longer exposures and smaller apertures.

      There are more digital examples on my site with the 87. Anything under the closeup/macro or open end category in monochrome is probably done with the 87 (zoneplate/anomalies too.)
      If you look closer you can see a hint of blue around zone 5/6 if you were using the old zone system from highlight to shadow. No color swapping involved.

      Have fun and I hope you enjoy this bandwidth,
      Paul R.

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