Postprocessing

Last month, a fellow photographer hosted a nice discussion on her blog about post processing – do we do it, how much, personal reasons and some discussion of ethics. While I might wish to be a purist, it reminded me of how much fun I used to have in the darkroom, dodging, burning, measuring and masking to superimpose or just for finer exposure adjustment. So for June I gave myself the project of working on images that captured high detail in camera and required extensive post processing. Continue reading

Mule Days

Every year during the Memorial Day weekend, our small community of 3900 host approximately 30,000 guest for one of the best festivities in the nation – Mule Days.
What once started as a low key event for packers & outfitters to show their skills and for local businesses to attract vacationers to the Owens valley, this six day event just celebrated its 44th year and draws ranchers, trainers, packers and spectators from all over the world. Continue reading

Historic Cemeteries

Cemeteries offer so much for photography. Art, sculpture & architecture, shadows and countless untold or forgotten stories.
The individual stories of each person interned, as well as that of the community. One can often see the economic and political eras of a community by the layout of the sections: fraternal orders, racial/ethnic, religious, pioneers, etc., as well as by the materials used: wood, iron, brick, stone. Everything within the cemetery tells the highs and lows a community has experienced.
This month I was photographing some of the pioneer graves at Benton Hot Springs. While processing the shots, I was trying to verify a name on a faded marker when I came across a story from another stone I had shot. Continue reading

Photographing Historic Artifacts/Locations & the Pentax 70mm DA Limited

One of the beauty’s about photographing historic artifacts and locations is the freedom which the subject matter offers.
History, after all is just a story – actually, several stories; some known, some not.
Often, most forms of commercial photography emphasize portraying the subject matter in a specific light – so to speak. Glamour, political consciousness/opinion, product desire or consumer awareness, etc., all while utilizing various art techniques like form/shape, light, texture, and individual expression.
I find documenting historic artifacts/locations to be free in the sense I don’t focus much on portraying my subjects to an audience in a specific light. Each artifact/place has it’s own stories, telling each individual audience member a different story.
This is the beauty. No focus of right or wrong, glamour or coarseness. The subject will always tell each member of the audience their own individual, unique story. Continue reading