Lensbaby Twist 60 Optic

Last month I purchased the Lensbaby Twist 60 Optic.

It is based on the Petzval design and is supposed to produce a swirl of bokeh, much like the older Helios lenses. I had been curious about it since it was released but also very hesitant as most of the uses seemed to be focused around portraiture photography. As I rarely shoot pictures of people, I wondered how this style of lens effect would work with inanimate objects also.

At wide open f2.5 & f2.8 the swirl effect of the Twist 60 optic is very pronounced.

It does mild down significantly by f4 – f5.6 and is almost non existent by f8 producing a normal view from any standard lens. I found the wide open swirl effect to be a little distracting but really do like how a minute amount of swirl from the f4 – f5.6 range does make the subject stand out a bit more.

Where this optic really shines for me is mounted on a 25mm extension tube, bringing it up to almost a 1:2.4 magnification macro.

I did try it on a 44mm tube but didn’t like the effect as much as the 1:2 ratio.

Though I occasionally find a use for the Sweet Spot or Slice Focus of my other Lensbaby optics, my favorite optics so far have been the Zoneplate and Plastic. I’m quickly seeing the Lensbaby Twist 60 optic will join those two.

Something about the “so called” imperfections of early film photography appeals to me.

 

Macro Photography Lens Stacking

As I’ve mentioned on my macros page, I’m not a macro photography purist.
I don’t focus on achieving a 1:1 life-size ratio when photographing a subject.
I do prefer using dedicated macro lenses (at least close focus) or macro techniques while doing close focus work as I find there is less distortion than with wide angle lenses.
I also enjoy trying anything that will spur my creativity.

Lens Stacking, Lens Reversal, Pentax M200/4, Rodagon 105/5.6, Bishop CA, Pentax K-1, Macro, Macro Photography, 2:1 Photography, Closeup Photography, Extreme Macro Photography, Fine Art Photography

This last winter, I was reading a website on extreme macro photography lens stacking and came across an article about using the Pentax M200/4 as a barrel lens for micro-photograpy work.
Extreme-Macro is a fantastic site for studying anything to do with close focus work. There is a wealth of information ranging from techniques to lenses, lighting or magnification calculations.
The page I stumbled upon mentioned the Pentax M200/4 as a wonderful lens to couple with a microscope objective for extreme work.

Lens Stacking, Lens Reversal, Pentax M200/4, Rodagon 105/5.6, Bishop CA, Pentax K-1, Macro, Macro Photography, 2:1 Photography, Closeup Photography, Extreme Macro Photography, Fine Art Photography

As I have an old M200 that doesn’t get used in this digital age, I decided to pull it out and see what I might be able to do with what I already had on hand or at least low cost investment.
A 52mm-52mm coupling ring, a 52mm-40.5mm step-down ring (which I did have to buy) and my old Rodagon 105/5.6 enlarging lens reverse mounted.
I must admit here that I am often lazy about using a tripod unless doing night shots and still prefer using an optical viewfinder over the rear lcd so achieving and maintaining focus with any depth of field would be a challenge.
I was surprised at how easy this combination was to hand hold and still achieve nice photos with a magnification of approx. 1.9:1.
Also, it was a fantastic pleasure to view something larger than life and try to see it in an artistic style.

Lens Stacking, Lens Reversal, Pentax M200/4, Rodagon 105/5.6, Bishop CA, Pentax K-1, Macro, Macro Photography, 2:1 Photography, Closeup Photography, Extreme Macro Photography, Fine Art Photography

Next I tried a reverse mount combination of the M200 with a Sigma 24/2.8 for a magnification ratio of approx. 8.3:1.
The added weight of the Sigma made it much harder to handhold but still produced nice results, though even at f16 the depth of field is very shallow.
This will take a lot more practice to get the my creative sight going.

I have been enjoying this new artistic view of the world so much that I just purchased an old EL-Nikkor 50/2.8 enlarging lens to use in the field (don’t want to take my Rodenstock out into the elements)
and am now on the hunt for an infinity focus objective plus adapter.

Pentax K1 testing Old Glass

Received the new Pentax K1 and decided to run a few test with the older vintage lenses I still have.

Nothing special with the images and minimal post processing, just to show the clarity. Have been pleasantly surprised with the results. I’ll list the lens below each shot posted for reference.

Kiron 28-105 2.8 (respectively), some vignetting at 28 and a little purple fringing. Still very sharp for its age. Shot at f8.

Tokina 70-210 4.5-5.6 (respectively), Slight purple fringing at 210, sharper than my current Sigma 70-200 2.8 APO DG. Shot at f8

Tamron SP90 Macro 1:1, very sharp. Shot at f8

yale lockset macro

Tokina 70-210 4.5-5.6 @210 with +10 Diopter, shot at f8. Some purple fringing with no hood but pleasantly surprised.

inyo register macro