BIG Problem with Pentax m 100mm f4 Macro

Just picked up a Pentax m 100mm f4 Macro with dental scale and decided to give it a test run in the yard.
1st under natural light on Helicoid K for 1:1 (clover blossom).

Plant Photography, Clover Blossom, Pentax Helicoid, Pentax M 100mm Macro, Pentax K1, Macro, Macro Photography, 1:1 Photography, Closeup Photography, Fine Art Photography

Next I tried 1:2 with diffused flash (bee).

Then I tried to lay stealth in some bushes but could never seem to lock focus before subject skittered away.
Took a while to figure out the problem.

Cat Photography, Cat, Pentax Helicoid, Pentax M 100mm Macro, Pentax K1, Macro, Macro Photography, 1:1 Photography, Closeup Photography, Fine Art Photography
DO NOT let the cat join you on that Macro outing.
Really like this lens, seems to produce as well as my copy of the Tamron 90.

Picked up this lens to try with IR as the Tamron 90 macro suffers from hotspots. It performs stellar with the Tiffen 87.

 

Read more at: https://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/14-general-talk/368627-big-problem-m100-macro.html#ixzz5J0KpmTIN

Bodie State Park in Infrared

It’s been a couple months since I’ve taken the time to photograph, so decided to do my usual spring adventure to Bodie State Park and try some infrared photography with the Lensbaby Twist 60.

Bodie, Ghost Town Photography, Lensbaby Twist 60 Optic, Petzval Effect Photography, Petzval Effect, Pentax K1, Infrared Photography, R72, IR, Infrared, Fine Art Photography

Made the trip simple, using one lens and one filter. Though I usually prefer the effects of the Tiffen 87, this time I decided to use the Hoya R72 so I would have some images to convert to faux color. The images I didn’t convert I left in the normal blue/red this filter produces rather than converting to monochrome.

A gallery of Bodie State Park artifacts and another of buildings (faux color).

Steinheil Cassarit and Ultraviolet Photography

I’m finding ultraviolet photography to be one of the biggest challenges I’ve come across in the photographic process in years. Such a huge learning curve.

Due to the short bandwidth of ultraviolet light, the reflective transmittance doesn’t seem to travel as far as visible light, plus this also causes a focus shift issue as photographing in infrared does.

With the sensitivity of the converted camera, I have been able to pick up the ultraviolet spectrum at a decent iso (around 800 – 1600 as opposed to 200 – 400) and live view permits achieving a fine focus if I take the time to really review and adjust before I shoot.

More of the problem seems to be in the lenses. Glass, air space and the cement used to join elements in a lens all interfere with the UV transmission. True UV transmission lenses (made with quartz-fluorite elements instead of glass) are still manufactured and a few older ones can be found second hand but these are way beyond my price range at an approximate cost of $3000US and up.

Fortunately ultravioletphotgraphy.com has a list of true and “accidental” lenses for ultraviolet photography work. I managed to pick up one of the Steinheil 50mm Cassarits recently and imediately noticed a difference. While not a spectacular shot, it is the first time I’ve been able to achieve focus on any subject farther away than about six inches.

Cat Photography, Animal Photography, Cat, Steinheil Cassarit 50mm, Pentax K1, UltraViolet Photography, UV, UltraViolet, U360 Filter, 360nm Photography, Fine Art Photography

This was shot midday 1/4 second, f8, iso 1600 using a Hoya U360 and S8612 bringing it to around a 360-365nm light source. The Steinheil triplets have been tested to have a cutoff of around 320nm. I am looking forward to testing this lens (as well as an older Cassarit 100mm) with a Hoya U340 to see if I can achieve a deeper UV cutoff point.

Cat Photography, Animal Photography, Cat, Steinheil Cassarit 50mm, Pentax K1, UltraViolet Photography, UV, UltraViolet, U360 Filter, 360nm Photography, UV false Color, Fine Art Photography

Here is the same photo with false color applied.

Pinhole Ultraviolet Transmission Lens Test

Learning Ultraviolet Photography is proving to be such a challenge it reminds me of when I first picked up a camera. How wonderful to be able to shoot 35 photos and not find a single keeper. Reminds me of the film days. I’m finding that trying to imagine how an image will appear, when the focus is using non visible light, has many variables that can affect the outcome.

One of course is the light source. If you don’t have full sun cover, using a dedicated light for a specific bandwidth or a full spectrum flash is essential. Next is choosing quality filters that absorb all light not wanted to affect the image. Also, I’m finding that the lens choice is just as important as the light source itself. Very few lenses are truly dedicated UV lenses made from quartz rather than glass, so the challenge is finding “accidental” lenses that permit good UV transmission.

Below is a basic test I used to determine which of my older lenses would permit the best UV transmission in the 360-365nm bandwidth. I used a pinhole cover with a dedicated Hoya U360 and BG40 filter stack to eliminate all light in the visible and IR range. I used a white plastic as the background and focused a dedicated 365nm light on it. White balance was done on the background. Exposure time was 15 sec and iso 1600. All phtos were post processed with the same settings.

All lenses tested were set to f4 and the rear of the lens was set at 2 1/2 inches from the background. Lenses tested were the Lensbaby Sweet 35 and Edge 80 optics, the Lensbaby Twist 60 and Selective Focus optics, an El-Nikkor 50/4 and Meyer Optik Domiplan 50/2.8 and Helios 44M 58/2. The Domiplan is supposed to transmit down to 345nm from other test located on ultravioletphotography.com (great reference site). The El-Nikkor is also supposed to be a good transmitter. The clearer the light through the lens itself signifies better UV transmission, purple signifies the worst.

From my basic, non-scientific test I was suprised to see the Lensbaby Soft Focus optic seems to perform as well as the Domiplan and both the Lensbaby and Zeniton 35mm lenses performed well. The Zeniton 135 performed poorly, even though it is the same optical construction (4 element / 4 groups) as the Zeniton 35.

Test are as follows:

Lensbaby Sweet 35 and Edge 80 optics

Ultraviolet transmission test, Pinhole Optic, LensBaby, Sweet 35 optic, Edge 80 optic, Hoya U360 filter, 365nm light, UltraViolet, UltraViolet Photography, 365nm Photography, BG40 filter, Bishop CA

Lensbaby Twist 60 and Soft Focus optics

Ultraviolet transmission test, Pinhole Optic, LensBaby, Twist 60 optic, Soft Focus optic, Hoya U360 filter, 365nm light, UltraViolet, UltraViolet Photography, 365nm Photography, BG40 filter, Bishop CA

El-Nikkor 50/4 and Domiplan 50/2.8

Ultraviolet transmission test, Pinhole Optic, LensBaby, El-Nikkor 50/4, Meyer Optic Domiplan 50/2.8, Hoya U360 filter, 365nm light, UltraViolet, UltraViolet Photography, 365nm Photography, BG40 filter, Bishop CA

Zeniton 35/3.5 and 135/3.5

Helios 44M 58/2

Ultraviolet transmission test, Pinhole Optic, LensBaby, Helios 44M 58/2, Hoya U360 filter, 365nm light, UltraViolet, UltraViolet Photography, 365nm Photography, BG40 filter, Bishop CA

Infrared Filter Comparison

I’ve really been enjoying working in digital IR this last year and have been doing a few Infrared Filter Comparisons to see which effect I prefer the most. I have attached a test subject of a tree stump in the desert shot with R72, #87 & IR850(87c) at the end for comparison. Continue reading

Tiffen 87 IR Filter

Testing the Tiffen #87

Recently I picked up a NIB Tiffen #87 Infrared filter to see if I would enjoy working more with the shorter IR wavelengths (to produce a truer Black and White image) or if I wanted to stay with the 720 and under filters to achieve some color from visible light.
I have always preferred viewing B&W photos and movies to color and when I hold an image in my mind it is almost always in B&W.Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, monochrome, monochrome photography, Pentax K-01, Tiffen #87 Filter, Mono Lake CA, Owns Valley CA, Lee Vining CA
The 87 comes in around 795 or just at the baseline of the IR spectrum. Not quite as black as the 093 (830) or 87c (850) but still dark to the human eye.Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, monochrome, monochrome photography, Pentax K-01, Tiffen #87 Filter, Mono Lake CA, Owns Valley CA, Lee Vining CA
I do like the contrasty effect the monochrome images have over the false color, though it is difficult to achieve focus.
Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, monochrome, monochrome photography, Pentax K-01, Tiffen #87 Filter, Mono Lake CA, Owns Valley CA, Lee Vining CA
The majority of my favorite lenses are still manual focus, so I will just have to practice more.
If you can find this filter it is made of glass with a metal ring and well constructed, plus it comes in at about 1/2 the price of other name brands.
I find the images comparable to the Lee 87 film filters for those who already have a holder system.
Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, monochrome, monochrome photography, Pentax K-01, Lee #87 Filter, Mono Lake CA, Owns Valley CA, Lee Vining CA
I did notice under the right light and white balance there were a few shots that did have a hint of blue sky after an attempt at color swapping.

 

Lensbaby Plastic Optic

Recently picked up the Lensbaby Plastic Optic.

I arrived at Lensbaby to late to buy the original optics as a kit and started with the Sweet35.

Selective Focus Photography, Plastic Optic, LensBaby, Exa Camera, Pentax K-01, Bishop CA, Owns Valley CA
Lensbaby Plastic Optic @f8

Though the Lensbaby system isn’t for everyday shooting, I really enjoy the special effects they create.
Think I own all of the original optics now plus the Sweet35 & Edge80.

Selective Focus Photography, Plastic Optic, LensBaby, Exa Camera, Pentax K-01, Bishop CA, Owns Valley CA
Lensbaby Plastic Optic @ f4

Of all of the first generation plug ins, I think the Zoneplate and the Plastic are my two favorites. Really enjoy the vintage Holga or Dinah look this optic creates.

Selective Focus Photography, Plastic Optic, LensBaby, Exa Camera, Pentax K-01, Bishop CA, Owns Valley CA
Lensbaby Plastic Optic @ f2.8

And a few from the filed

Infrared Photography and Pentax F300/4.5

Added a couple of new lenses to the infrared photography lens hotspot database,
the Pentax F300/4.5 and the Pentax F 35-70/3.5-4.5.

Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, Pentax K-01, R72 Filter, Pentax F300/4.5, Owns Valley CA, Sierra Nevada CA, Mount Humphreys CA, IR Hotspot, Database

Both performed very well with no hotspots or flare issues.
The autofocus on both was fast and accurate.
Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, Pentax K-01, R72 Filter, Pentax F300/4.5, Owns Valley CA, Sierra Nevada CA, Horton Creek CA, IR Hotspot, Database

I especially enjoyed the extended telephoto reach of the F300.
Can see how this lens is rated as a stellar performer and could easily become a go to lens choice.
Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, Pentax K-01, R72 Filter, Pentax F300/4.5, Owns Valley CA, Sierra Nevada CA, Basin Mountain CA, IR Hotspot, Database

IR Lens Hotspot Database

kolarivision.com has an excellent ir lens hotspot database already compiled; however, I noticed most of my older film lenses weren’t included so decided to create a database (bottom of page) testing these lenses on the Pentax K-01.

Infrared Photography, Infra Red, IR Photography, Faux Color, Pentax K-01, R72 Filter, Manzanar CA, Owns Valley CA, Japanese Internment, IR Hotspot, Database
Pentax A35/2.8 Continue reading

What’s the fuss about lens quality reviews

(Recently submitted post to PentaxForums.)

I find it curious how we photographers fret so much over lens quality reviews or lens superiority AND I do understand the difference between precision engineered glass and a soda bottle.

It’s easy to blur/fade an image made from a lens transmitting great IQ but impossible to add detail from an optic that never saw it in the first place.

I was using PF long before I became a member (I know, my bad) because of the wonderful amount of knowledge shared here by fellow Pentaxians. The lens database is incredible, especially the coverage of vintage and third party lenses.

My ex girlfriend shoots Canon and doing a fair amount of research there, it seems nearly impossible to find any reviews on anything other than the “latest & greatest” (and never so much information in one place.) I sense PF members seem more concerned with sharing creative process than promoting Market Hype.

I curb myself as much as possible from LBA but do like to keep informed on lens performance (vintage and modern), especially the diversified hands on experience I find here. Reading a recent post on Lenses and the K-1, I was very pleased with a response by Noel Porter. “One of the key things with any lens is understanding it’s characteristics and using it’s strengths or avoiding it’s weak areas (soft corners wide open etc).” (Read more at: http://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/190-pentax-k-1/329374-my-k-1-wasted-my-legacy-glass.html#ixzz4JuFQw1zm)

I’ve always viewed lenses as paint brushes. An artist may use two different brushes of the same size or shape to achieve different desired effects.

My main workhorse lens is a Sigma 24-60/2.8, it provides consistently good IQ. It will never provide the color and smoothness of my M50/1.7, the sharpness of my A50/2.8 macro or dirty/gritty film feel of my Vivitar 35/2.8. The Sigma 70-200/2.8 DG OS USM is in no way superior to my old F300/4.5 for IQ, but is the “go-to” lens during low light, nighttime sports events (and yet it never finds itself in the vest pocket like the tak-f 70-200 on a day hike.) They each are what they are.

Still, one of my favorite techniques is – NO LENS PHOTOGRAPHY (IQ be damned) – images below.

Zone Plate on K3

Black Locust Blooms, backyard photography, garden photography, plant photography, fine art, zone plate

http://www.instructables.com/id/PHOTOGRAPHY%3A-Creating-Perfect-Pinholes-and-Zonepla/

http://www.whizkidtech.redprince.net/zoneplate/

Writing with light – The brush doesn’t make the painting, the painting dictates the brush.

I’m consistently impressed while reading an inquiry here on the forums, how often a responding member will ask for more information on someones shooting style, subject matter, etc. before giving a recommendation. Sometimes it’s the newest technology when appropriate but often members encourage us to explore the strong characteristics of what we might already have or can easily obtain.

I look forward to reading more “fretting” over lenses, you folks make it an enjoyable treat and me happy to be a member of PF.

Another Zone Plate

Laws - California - locomotive - slim princess - railroads - museums - zone plate - black&white - monochrome - Bishop

Pentax K1 testing Old Glass

Received the new Pentax K1 and decided to run a few test with the older vintage lenses I still have.

Nothing special with the images and minimal post processing, just to show the clarity. Have been pleasantly surprised with the results. I’ll list the lens below each shot posted for reference.

Kiron 28-105 2.8 (respectively), some vignetting at 28 and a little purple fringing. Still very sharp for its age. Shot at f8.

Tokina 70-210 4.5-5.6 (respectively), Slight purple fringing at 210, sharper than my current Sigma 70-200 2.8 APO DG. Shot at f8

Tamron SP90 Macro 1:1, very sharp. Shot at f8

yale lockset macro

Tokina 70-210 4.5-5.6 @210 with +10 Diopter, shot at f8. Some purple fringing with no hood but pleasantly surprised.

inyo register macro

 

ND Filter Color Cast Test

Lately I’ve been examining the color cast created by the ND filters I own.
I have a beautiful Singh-Ray soft grad 0.9 that was given to me as a gift years ago and a set of Formatt Hitech 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 which I use primarily for strobe work.
Granted the Formatt’s are resin CR-39 instead of glass but they permit me to open my aperture for shallow DOF with the slow flash sync speed of the Pentax.
I have notice a small amount of magenta color cast while using them as such but never found it to be too overwhelming to clean out in post.

Nevada - Montgomery Pass - Boundry Peak Motel - Boundry Peak - abandoned - abandoned motel - monochrome - historic locations - Formatt Hitech ND Filter - ND Filter Review - nd filter color castFormatt ND0.9 with Yongnuo IV Speedlight

On a shoot a couple of months back I tried to stack the Formatts to achieve a 7 stop ND effect.
Wow, was the color cast dense. So heavy I couldn’t pinpoint a spot with either LR or PS Raw to achieve a natural WB.
Looking on the web for ND color cast I came across a review for the Ice ND1000 by a fellow Pentaxian which showed minimal casting between the image shot and corrected.
When B&H listed the P series of $49.95, I decided to give it a try. If I didn’t like it I wouldn’t be out that much.
While I haven’t used it much, I’ve been pleased with the results so far. It is made of optical glass and feels much like my Singh-Ray in build quality, one to take care of for long life

California - Bishop - Sculpture - White Mountain - historic locations - Ice ND Filter - Ice ND1000 - ND Filter - ND Filter Review - nd filter color castIce ND1000 + 1.3 stop circular polarizer

California - Bishop - Horned Lizard - Horned Toad - animals on the decline - circular polarizer - ND Filter ReviewSpectator during the shoot 1.3 stop circular polarizer

Decided to try an experiment to see how my filters compared to each other for cast by brand.
I kept as many constants as possible: tripod, f8.0, ISO 100, 50mm focal length and WB set in camera to 5500k.
In LR the as shot WB showed as 5300 temp and -16 tint (slightly to the green) on all photos.
I chose the exact same point (mid grey rock) in each photo to achieve the WB correction and will list the difference with each photo. Continue reading